November 22, 2014

GIANTS WERE REAL!: 99% Information Hidden/Removal From Public/World – Proof Is Everywhere Except Media, Education, Science, History…WHY? [Censorship Level: High] :)

giants

The World was completely covered in giants on every continent before and after modern man appeared on the scene.
The Proof is everywhere, or was. On every continent, except South America, all (remains) were confiscated and vanished. ALL!

In one case in America, 60 skeletons 10 to 12 feet tall were found in a cave by some farmers. Every single one vanished. And in their place were put fake artifacts and the heights were changed to between 6 and 8 feet, everywhere.
Only old stories of eye witnesses are left to dispute the “Official Story”.

“There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare [children] to them, the same [became] mighty men which [were] of old, men of renown.” Gen 6:4


___ From North America to South America Native American Lore Speaks of Giants ___ Artwork by Ernist Nelson

Human Giants

Walking in the footsteps of giants
Garry Nelson

For most people their first giant encounter was most likely with David and Goliath, Jack and the Beanstalk, or some other bed time story. For me it was different.

When I was very small, not yet five, I lay on my grandmother’s lap late on a Saturday night watching Creature Features, hosted by Bob Wilkins. I grew up in Nevada. We received much of the California broadcasting. There was no cable in those days. The movie we were watching had a giant in it. My grandmother commented that my great grandfather was a giant. I asked if she meant my grandpa with the one hand. I thought she meant him because he was six and a half feet tall. She said, “No, that is your grandfather. I’m talking about your great grandfather, he was much bigger.”

I am told that my great grandfather was seven feet tall or more and could grab people by their head with one hand his finger tips resting on their eyebrows his palm on the base of their skull, he would guide them as he pleased. My mother reports that his ears were between six and seven inches from top to bottom. I was told how he had a horse that was six feet high at the back and he could be seen over the saddle from the shoulders up. That’s a big man.

The interesting thing is, through my life from grade school to adulthood, I have met with different people who could not believe the story of my great grandfather’s size. From polite people who I could feel thought I was telling tall tales, (Pun intended.) to people who flat out called me a liar or an idiot. This compelled me to do a lot of giant research in my teens.

Red-Haired Giants of Nevada
Growing up in Nevada I had heard stories of the Sitecah from the Paiute Indians that lived in the area. They told of red-haired men and women of light colored skin as tall as 12 feet who originally lived in the area when the Paiutes had first arrived. Evidently these human giants liked to eat the Indians so they had problems making friends. The Indian tribes of the area finally joined and ambushed the giants killing most of them on the spot. The remaining giants took refuge in a cave. The Indians demanded they come out and fight but the giants refused. So, the Indians piled brush into the cave and set it on fire. Any giants that did run out were shot with arrows, the remaining giants were asphyxiated.

In the 1800s this cave was known as Horse Shoe Cave but is now called Lovelock Cave. Lovelock cave is located around 20 miles South of Lovelock Nevada.


Lovelock Cave Giant Jaw Comparison
In 1911 bat guano harvesters started working in this same cave. After digging out four feet of guano they found many broken arrows that the Indians had fired into the cave as well as other interesting artifacts, and yes, they found red-haired giants. Even in the shrunken mummified condition the skeletons ranged in height from 8 feet to just under 12 feet. I did an internet search on this subject and found that the reported heights are very different from what I am stating here. (Internet says 6.5 feet to 8 feet.) My account is from what I was told growing up in Nevada. I will leave it up to you to decide on the heights based on the photo of one of the cave giant’s jaw bone and dental cast of a regular man’s teeth. Most of the artifacts have been lost over time due to lack of interest from science. Go figure. However some of the artifacts are in the Humboldt Museum at Winnemucca Nevada and in the Nevada State Historical Society’s museum at Reno.

The Review-Miner June 19, 1931 Reported the find of two giant skeletons in the Humboldt lake bed. Both skeletons were wrapped in a gum treated fabric. The first skeleton was 8 and one half feet tall, the second was just under 10 feet tall.

In 1877 prospectors outside of Eureka Nevada found a human leg broken off four inches above the knee cap including the foot. This leg was found sticking out of solid red quartzite rock dating from the time of the dinosaurs. After using their picks to extract their find from the rock they took it to Eureka. Medical doctors examined the bones and stated that it did indeed belong to a human of very modern appearance. The interesting part was the size of the bones. They measured from heel to knee 39 inches. The owner would have stood over 12 feet tall. The area was searched for more remains but nothing else was found. This story was heavily published in the newspapers of the time.

Olowalu Maui Hawaii Petroglyphs
Red-Haired Giants of Hawaii
For over 20 years now I have been living in the islands of Hawaii. Only a few years after I had first moved here I again heard about red-haired giants. Two giant 10 and 12 foot red-haired skeletons were found in a lava cave in a canyon behind Olowalu Hawaii. I drove out to Olowalu to see what I could find out. After making my way off the main road onto the old road. I turned up the canyon in which I had been told the research was happening. After a little exploring I found some excellent though strange petroglyphs on the side of a rock out cropping. I was just able to take a few pictures before a white SUV drove up with a man and a woman in it. The woman was driving. The woman told me that I would have to leave the area. After talking with her for a few minutes she admitted that Red-haired skeletons had been found and that they were much larger than they should be. She would not tell me any exact measurements. She did say that they did not want to upset the Hawaiians with their discoveries. The man never spoke even when I greeted him.

It should be noted that although there is the spirit of Pele that is the Goddess of fire believed to live in the volcano. Pele started out as a physical Pele that traveled the islands. She is described as extremely tall with fiery red hair, fair skin, great strength, incredible beauty, veracious sexual appetite and a deadly temper. It is mentioned that Pele’s father is the man-eater Ku-waha-ilo who dwells in the far off heavens. Pele traveled the islands of Hawaii digging underground tunnels in an effort to find a spot that she could dig deep caves that did not flood with water so she could make a safe home for her family.

Several days after meeting the man and woman in the SUV, I went back at night. More than anything I wanted to see exactly where the discovery was. This time I took a sugar cane road in from another direction. I four wheeled it in so that I would be on the ridge above the canyon on top of the rock outcropping with the petroglyphs. I was not there very long before headlights came on below me and started working their way to me. I knew I could be gone before they could get to me but I figured I just as well go meet them. It turned out to be a local guy who was hired as security to guard the site. He told me that Yes, two giants were found. A man and a woman, the big one was easily 12 feet. He did not like staying all night in the canyon it gave him the willies. I kept him company for a while and he told me where the cave was. Not that it mattered they covered it completely when they were done. Even now the area where I had driven my truck on the ridge to look into the canyon is a housing development.

Close but no cigar. Now, as interesting as the Hawaiian part of my story is the giant’s size is not first-hand and there is no evidence. So, it does not really count as proof of a race of giants.

Giants in Peru
Recently I took a trip to Peru and guess what jumped out at me in some of the museums I visited there? Yes, it was giants. In Peru they are not whisked away like they are in the USA. (It should be noted that there have been hundreds of giant discoveries in the USA that have been either ignored or taken into custody by the Smithsonian never to be seen again.) The Incas actually had kings that were giants and had red and blond hair. In the Gold Museum in Lima you can still see the clothing and head of an Incan king who stood an easy 10 feet tall. His golden robe is 8 feet long and did not touch the ground when he wore it. His gold gloves are twice as long as my hands.


I have tried to keep this within the realm of my own experiences. There is so much more to this. Like the 64 pound sledge hammer found in a 3500 year old copper mine near the town of Llandudno in North Wales. Giant axes unearthed in Iran, Giant swords, etc.You could read for weeks on the subject of giants and if your mind is anything like mine enjoy every minute of it. I would suggest googeling Solomon Island giants, red haired giants, Arizona giants, California giants, Ohio giants, Peruvian giants.

I could go on forever about giants but the fact is Science says that races of giant humans do not exist and never have.

I sure wish they would stop leaving their stuff lying around.

Yes, I know my grandmother should not have let a 5 year old watch creature features.

http://youtu.be/pLBIXq292UM

The Truth About Nephilim Giants (Full Video) – Steve Quayle

david-and-goliath1

Painting by Brian Snoddy 2005

Painting by Brian Snoddy 2005

Rome vs Senone Giants

About 387 B.C., or shortly before, some three hundred thousand Senones, one of the Celts’ southernmost tribes, found their land on the Adriatic coast too small for their bulging population. Led by Brennus, their chieftain, they crossed over the Apennines and swarmed into northern Italy, ravaging Etruscan towns and the surrounding country as they went. While looting the Etruscans, Polybius says the Senones took a liking for their beautiful country and decided to occupy it themselves. So, on a small pretext, the Gallic giants suddenly attacked the Etruscans with a sizable army and expelled them from the plains of the Po.139 They then spread over the whole of northern Italy. For some time they laid siege to “the splendid Etruscan city of Clusium.”

Unable to halt the Senones’ advance, the terrified Etruscans sent an urgent plea to Rome—their own ancient enemy—for military help. Perhaps still feeling the economic pinch of their recent war with the Etruscans, or possibly not realizing the gravity of the situation, the Roman Senate decided against military aid. Instead they voted to send three envoys to Clusium to mediate the dispute between the native Etruscans and the invading Celts. For its envoys, the Senate chose three noblemen, all of the well-known Fabian family. While on this assignment, however, one of these gentlemen, Quintus Fabius, committed an act that ignited a quarrel between the Senones and Rome itself. The Senones, bent upon punishing Rome for the offense, eventually brought that great city to its knees.

According to Livy, when the Roman deputation arrived at Clusium to help resolve the conflict, the Celts informed them that “this was indeed the first time they had heard of them, but they assumed the Romans must be courageous people because it was to them that the Clusians had turned in their hour of need. And since the Romans had tried to help with an embassy and not with arms, they themselves would not reject the offer of peace, provided the Clusians ceded part of their superfluous agricultural land; that was what they, the Celts, wanted…. If it were not given,” they warned, “they would launch an attack before the Romans’ eyes, so that the Romans could report back how superior the Gauls were in battle to all others. . . . The Romans then asked whether it was right to demand land from its owners on pain of war, indeed what were the Celts doing in Etruria in the first place? The latter defiantly retorted that their right lay in their arms: to the brave belong all things.”140

The resolute Clusians, however, refused to part with any portion of their land. The Senones, reacting to their unwillingness to share, took up arms. Although the quarrel did not involve him, Quintus Fabius sided with the Clusians and slew a Celtic chieftain. In the aftermath, the Celts demanded that the Roman Senate deliver up the Fabians and sent to Rome their delegation to watch the proceedings. Instead of yielding up the Fabians, the Senate appointed the three as military tribunes with consular powers for the coming year—the highest honors that could have been bestowed upon them. When the incensed Senone delegation reported to their people this slap in their face, a furor—for which they were most famous—arose in the ranks of the blond Celtic giants. That tense, dramatic scene Livy captured in these few words: “From all the immense host, covering miles of ground with its straggling masses of horse and foot, the cry went up, To Rome!'”141

With that cry, a Senone army of some thirty thousand giants began their march, arousing “the whole region with their wild singing and horrible and diverse yelling.” As vast numbers of their noisy foot warriors, horsemen, chariots, and supply carts rambled across the land toward Rome, peasants from both countryside and village fled in terror before them. News of the advancing giants reached Rome almost too late. After hastily devising a plan for defense, Rome’s legionnaires marched out to intercept the enraged Celtic horde. Upon reaching the little river Allia, a mere eleven miles from Rome, they found themselves face-to-face with a great throng of Goliath’s cousins from north of the Apennines.

That terrifying July day the Latins would never forget. The great Celts unnerved them. Some of the giants they saw wore chain-wrought iron cuirasses, and some wore only shirts gathered up “with belts plated with gold or silver.” But many wore no armor nor clothes, preferring instead to go into battle naked. Most, however, wore overlong broadswords slung around the right flanks on chains of iron or bronze. The spears and javelins they brandished give us some idea of their size and strength. On the spears were affixed “iron heads a cubit in length and even more, and a little under two palms in breadth.”142 Also, the Celts’ swords were not shorter than the javelins of average-size peoples, and just the heads of their javelins exceeded in length the swords of others.143 For those confused by these comparisons, Henri Hubert furnishes a most accurate measurement of some Celtic swords. Those that archaeologists recovered “from the second period of La Tene,” he reports, “are about 96 inches long.” And, he adds, without providing any figures, “the latest swords are still longer.”144 It goes without saying, of course, that such enormous weapons required equally enormous men to wield them.

But the terror the Romans felt at the Allia sprang not from the Celts’ height and armaments alone. These supermen also assaulted their eyes and ears with fierce looks, deep voices, and pre-battle antics. One of these antics called for some of the huge Celtic champions, when they were formed for battle, to step out in front of their lines, brandish their large weapons menacingly at their smaller adversaries and challenge the most valiant among them to single combat. We do not know whether any Romans accepted such a challenge at the Allia, but if they did, according to Celtic custom, each challenger would have then broken forth into a song praising the valiant deeds of his ancestors and boasting of his own high achievements, while at the same time reviling and belittling his opponent, and trying by such talk “to strip him of his bold spirit before the combat.”145 Not just the champion warriors, but the whole Celtic army took part in this psychological warfare. Beating their swords rhythmically against their shields, they assailed the enemy’s ears with a tumult of almost intolerable sound. The whole country round seemed filled with their exceedingly loud war cries, accompanied by the unceasing blare of innumerable giant boar-headed war trumpeters and horn blowers. That wild, horrible, almost deafening din played on the Romans’ nerves, perhaps in a small way at first, but ever building toward a crescendo that made many an alarmed legionnaire’s hair stand on end.

At this crucial point, the Roman generals miscalculated the combat savvy of this hellish people. As the Senones advanced, they concealed some reserves on a hill for a flank attack. The Celts’ leaders saw through their strategy and executed a sudden assault on the hill where the reserves had been placed. Caught by surprise, the reserves were driven off the hill and into the ranks of the legion that had been positioned on the banks of the Allia. In the resulting confu-sion, these ranks panicked. As the Senone giants pressed their advantage and commenced a slaughter, the flustered, frightened Romans fled the field. Seeing their cohorts in full flight, the soldiers on the outer flank, who were not even involved in the maneuver, also turned tail and ran.146

But the giants did not immediately exploit their victory. For after a battle it was their custom to cut off the heads of all they had killed and display them before the king. “If he brings a head,” explains Herodotus, “a soldier is admitted to his share of the loot; no head, no loot.”147 As both Roman and Greek were to learn, the Celts also scalped their victims; from these skins they fashioned garments that looked something like handkerchiefs. These they proudly attached to the bridles of their horses. That’s the way they treated ordinary enemies. “With the heads of their worst enemies,” says Herodotus, “they proceed as follows: once they have sawn off everything below the eyebrows, they carefully clean out the head. If the owner is poor he will merely stretch calf-leather round it and use it thus. But if he is rich, he will also line the inside with gold and use it as a drinking vessel.” If in a quarrel a Celt killed his kinsman, he was treated in the same way: his kinsman’s head also ended up as a drinking vessel. On occasions when the Celt had guests in his home he would “bring out these heads and say how they … attacked him, and how he defeated them.”148 Livy reveals that the Boii, a giant Celtic tribe of the Po Valley, also followed this practice, so the custom probably was widespread among the entire Celtic nation.149 For certain, Celts everywhere venerated the skulls of their enemies’ heads. As archaeologists have discovered, they all decorated their doorways with them. They also skewered some heads of their enemies to staves and placed these on their roofs to act as guards for their homes.

So, following this tribal custom, the Celts spent the day after their victory at the Allia severing the heads of those they had killed, showing them to the king in order to claim a share of the loot, and then stowing them away to take home as trophies. This unusual suspension of hostilities gave Rome’s citizens time to flee. Three days after the Battle of Allia, when the barbarians did venture into the city, they encountered only a “deathly hush.” Practically the whole population had left. After gazing in awe at some of Rome’s excellent sights, the Celts ransacked the city, then set it afire.

But the giants soon learned they were not Rome’s sole occupiers. As they advanced on the Capitol itself, Marcus Manlius and his single maniple of courageous youths confronted them.150 Against Manlius’ small band, the Senones launched several assaults. The Capitol, however, stood atop a steep slope, and this high ground gave the Latins such an advantage in the skirmishes, notes Livy, that many corpses of the huge assailants “lay in piles under their swords because, as the bodies fell, they dropped down back into the ranks of the warriors below. The Gauls would not try this kind of fighting again.”151 Instead, they resorted to a siege. When that also failed, they tried a commando-like night attack. But as they advanced up the slope under the cover of darkness, the sacred Capitol geese awoke and, with their loud cackling, aroused the sleepy Roman sentries. Running to the front of the hill, Manlius “smote the first Gaul to come up with the back of his shield,” sending him reeling down the slope. “Soon the whole band of Gauls was rushing headlong back down.”152

As the siege dragged on, both sides experienced famine. The giants also soon fell victim to two somewhat incapacitating plagues: fever and dysentery. Seven months into the siege, they delivered to the Romans a pledge to withdraw from the country upon the payment of a “bushel of gold.”153 That amount the proud but deeply humiliated Romans barely raised, by Roman scales. The Celts, however, produced their own scales, which were a bit heavier than those used by the Romans. When the Roman magistrate objected, the Celtic chieftain Brennus insolently threw the weight of his heavy broadsword on the scales. He then reddened the faces of the already embarrassed Romans with this harsh threat: “Woe to the vanquished!” Such insolent words, says Livy, sounded most “intolerable to Roman ears.”154 It was, agrees Herm, “the worst humiliation Rome suffered in her history. Even in later, more glorious periods this scene, and the Celts, remained a wound which was never completely to heal.”155

The Celts, with their bushel of gold in tow, withdrew north of the Apennines—but not for long. According to historian Donald R. Dudley, “They made many other incursions into Italy, sometimes establishing themselves upon the Alban Hills, sometimes being hired as mercenaries by the Greek cities of the south.”157 Because of their easy victory over the Romans, the Celts came to regard them with contempt. They disparaged them as “little men,” while bragging about their own great size.156 “But Rome learned from her disaster. She equipped herself with the walls and the tactics which were necessary to withstand attacks of this kind.”158 Her generals also developed new ways to battle the giants in hand-to-hand combat. They found that the Celts’ large broadsword, for example, was inferior, “being blunt at the end and good only for cutting, not thrusting.” They therefore devised new techniques to defend themselves against the broadsword’s blows and practiced thrusting their own blades into the Celts’ unprotected parts. Eventually, the Romans also learned how to take some advantage of the Celts’ great height. “Tall men with shields too small to cover them offer an excellent target for javelins and arrows,” observes Herm, “and the Romans cold-bloodily exploited this.”159 They also learned to use the Celts’ super-stitious beliefs against them, as Caesar did against Ariovistus at Besancon.160 And for all their great stature and extraordinary strength and reckless courage, the Celts lacked the unity and discipline of the Roman army. That one shortcoming contributed greatly to their eventual downfall.

But not until more than one hundred and fifty years later, at the battle of Telamon, were the Romans able to avenge themselves on the Celts for their defeat at the Allia and for their chieftain’s gold-weighing insult at Rome. The opportunity for Rome to partially heal this wound came in the spring of 225, when a Celtic army of some seventy thousand men again crossed the Apennines and stormed across northern Italy. The exceedingly tall, fair-skinned warriors once more reached Clusium, only one hundred miles from Rome. But this time, instead of sending envoys, the Senate dispatched a Roman army. They came upon the Celts at Telamon in Etruria. In the decisive battle fought there, the invaders suffered enormous casualties. The Romans reportedly killed forty thousand Celts, or more than half their forces, and captured ten thousand more besides. No doubt such a great slaughter resulted, in part, from the Celts’ fanatical zeal. Caught by chance between the armies of the two Roman consuls, Lucius Aemilius Papus and Gaius Atilius, and having suffered heavy casualties in the cross fire of Roman javelins and arrows, the naked giant spearmen, “in their impotent rage, rushed wildly at the enemy and sacrificed their lives,” reports Polybius.161 Similarly, when the Romans engaged them in hand-to-hand combat, the Celts, even when there was no more hope, refused to give quarter. Instead they continued to fight the advancing Roman swordsmen with a suicidal fury.162

Despite this important victory, the Romans were not done with the golden-haired, hard-eyed, harsh-voiced barbarians who still lived in great numbers in the lands north of the Apennines. From their sanctuary they continued for many years to raid and plunder Italy. Not until much later times, when command of the legionnaires fell to the great military genius Gaius Marius, and afterward to his ambitious nephew Julius Caesar, were the Romans able to put an end to the Celtic threat. (See Caesar’s Triumph over the Giants; Celtic Giants; German Giants’ Annihilation; Giants Who Became Gods; Gomarian Giants; Twilight of the Celtic Giants)

In December, 1717, near the new church at Rotherhithe, some workers dug up a huge stone coffin that contained the skeleton of a man ten feet long. (See Graveyards of the Giants)

[ Steve Quaye.com ]

Comments

  1. More please.