December 17, 2017

Army Regulation 210–35 Installations: Civilian Inmate Labor Program 14 January 2005 UNCLASSIFIED [ PDF File ] H.R. 1955: Text of H.R. 1955 [110th]: Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism Prevention Act of 2007

Provides Army policy and guidance for establishing civilian inmate labor
programs and civilian prison camps on Army installations

1–5. Civilian inmate labor programs

a. Civilian inmate labor programs benefit both the Army and corrections systems by—

(1) Providing a source of labor at no direct labor cost to Army installations to accomplish tasks that would not be
possible otherwise due to the manning and funding constraints under which the Army operates.

(2) Providing meaningful work for inmates and, in some cases, additional space to alleviate overcrowding in nearby
corrections facilities.

(3) Making cost–effective use of buildings and land not otherwise being used.

b. Except for the 3 exceptions listed in paragraph 2–1d below, installation civilian inmate labor programs may use
civilian inmate labor only from Federal corrections facilities located either off or on the installation.

c. Keys to operating an effective civilian inmate labor program on Army installations include—

(1) Establishing a comprehensive lease agreement, interservice, interagency, and/or interdepartmental support agreement (ISA), and/or memoranda of agreement with the corrections facility.

(2) Developing a cooperative working relationship between installation personnel and corrections facility personnel.

(3) Working closely with installation government employee labor unions to ensure union leaders understand the
program and have current information on program status.

(4) Training all installation personnel involved in the operation or administration of the program frequently.

(5) Developing a public affairs plan informing the installation and the surrounding local community of the program
and work projects assigned to civilian inmate labor.

H.R. 1955

SEC. 899B. FINDINGS.

The Congress finds the following:

(1) The development and implementation of methods and processes that can be utilized to prevent violent radicalization, homegrown terrorism, and ideologically based violence in the United States is critical to combating domestic terrorism.

(2) The promotion of violent radicalization, homegrown terrorism, and ideologically based violence exists in the United States and poses a threat to homeland security.

(3) The Internet has aided in facilitating violent radicalization, ideologically based violence, and the homegrown terrorism process in the United States by providing access to broad and constant streams of terrorist-related propaganda to United States citizens.

(4) While the United States must continue its vigilant efforts to combat international terrorism, it must also strengthen efforts to combat the threat posed by homegrown terrorists based and operating within the United States.

(5) Understanding the motivational factors that lead to violent radicalization, homegrown terrorism, and ideologically based violence is a vital step toward eradicating these threats in the United States.

(6) Preventing the potential rise of self radicalized, unaffiliated terrorists domestically cannot be easily accomplished solely through traditional Federal intelligence or law enforcement efforts, and can benefit from the incorporation of State and local efforts.

(7) Individuals prone to violent radicalization, homegrown terrorism, and ideologically based violence span all races, ethnicities, and religious beliefs, and individuals should not be targeted based solely on race, ethnicity, or religion.

(8) Any measure taken to prevent violent radicalization, homegrown terrorism, and ideologically based violence and homegrown terrorism in the United States should not violate the constitutional rights, civil rights, or civil liberties of United States citizens or lawful permanent residents.

(9) Certain governments, including the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia have significant experience with homegrown terrorism and the United States can benefit from lessons learned by those nations.

[ US Army 210-35: Army Regulation 210–35 Installations: Civilian Inmate Labor Program ]

[ H.R. 1955: Text of H.R. 1955 [110th]: Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism Prevention Act of 2007